click to view original photo

Gretna Greens and Your Ancestor's Missing Marriage Records

When researching a marriage for a couple where you cannot find the record, you might want to explore the possibility of their going to a Gretna Green.

Share

Content Details

Type: Article
Resource: GenWeekly
Prepared by: Gena Philibert-Ortega
Word Count: 719 (approx.)
Labels: Marriage Record 
Short URL:

Add Comment

It can be frustrating to look for a marriage record. You check in the county they lived in, you check in the county the bride lived in, you check neighboring counties and still find nothing. When researching a marriage for a couple but cannot find the record where you think it might be or, perhaps, you have a 20th century couple that has no wedding portrait, you might want to explore the possibility of their going to a Gretna Green.

Gretna Greens are cities where people went to get married. They are named for a place called Gretna Green in Scotland. According to the web site for the Gretna Green, http://www.gretnaweddings.com/, because of Scotland's historical lax requirements for marriage; the couple only had to be over 16 years of age and declare themselves husband and wife in front of witnesses. People from neighboring countries like England have flocked to marry there. Gretna Green was the first post along the route from England to the Scotland border, so that's where eloping couples would stop to get married. With no restrictions such as residency requirements or parental consent (as long as the couple was over 16 years), Gretna Green, Scotland continues to be a place where couples from all over are married.

If you have an English ancestor whom you believe may have gone to Scotland to get married, check out the Achievements web site at http://www.achievements.co.uk/services/gretna/index.php, it has an index of Gretna Green marriages.

Gretna Greens in the United States were popular places to get married for a variety of reasons. One Gretna Green that existed about one hour from where I lived near Victorville, San Bernardino, California did not require a blood test to get married. Young, in love couples, could go there and get married quickly, without much fuss. As a teenager, I remember accompanying a friend who was in college, as she married her boyfriend at this Gretna Green. They filled out a paper but did not need a license or a blood test, paid a small amount of money and were married very quickly. Nothing fancy, but it got the job done. Other reasons for going to a Gretna Green to get married include, low fees, little paper work, and maybe even to get away from disapproving family members.

Some Gretna Greens exist because they may lack a waiting period. In 1927, California enacted the Gin Marriage Law. This law provided for a waiting period where a couple had to wait three days from the time they purchased their marriage license before they could get married. This was enacted at the height of the Probation era. The law was meant to stop couples who may be making the decision to become married while intoxicated, to give them some time to sober up. While this was the intention, the result of the law was that it drove couples to other places such as Yuma, Arizona and Las Vegas, Nevada, where they could get "quickie" marriages. Additionally, California passed a 1939 law that required a medical examination before marriage. During one year of the enforcement of the marriage law, Yuma recorded 17,000 marriages for a town that had 5,000 residents. Both Yuma and Las Vegas became the place for Hollywood stars and the everyday person to get married.

On May 5, 1943, then California Governor Earl Warren, repealed the Gin Marriage Law. On May 7, 1943 the Redlands Daily Facts (a newspaper for Redlands, San Bernardino, California) reported on a couple who were the first in San Bernardino to receive the new marriage license and planned to marry on a nearby military base.

Genealogist Arlene Eakle, www.arleneeakle.com, discusses Gretna Greens and provides a list of 19 such places in the February 19, 2007 posting on her blog. Reading her list and reader comments might provide you with some more ideas for places your ancestors may have run off to to get married.

Divorces can also be had in Gretna Green type places. Las Vegas, Nevada and Mexico had been popular places for Californians to run off to for quick, cheap divorces since about the 1930's. These are places where not only could the person seek a quick divorce, they could then get remarried quickly.

Researching nearby Gretna Green's may provide you with the answer as to why you haven't been able to find your ancestor's marriage.

Source Information: GenWeekly, New Providence, NJ, USA: Genealogy Today LLC, 2007.

The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of Genealogy Today LLC.

*Effective May 2010, GenWeekly articles that are more than five years old no longer require a subscription for full access.

Recent Feedback:
  • No matches for this listing.
  • << GenWeekly

    << Helpful Articles

     

    Suggested Next Steps (BETA)

  • Would you like to keep up-to-date with the latest releases from Genealogy Today, along with news from a variety of other sources by receiving The Genealogy News (a FREE service) by email? Yes, sign me up
  • Would you like to become a Genealogy Today member and be able to manage your research experience, post messages to forums, add comments to resources and much more? Yes, show me how
  • Would you like to tap into our community of over 85,000 members by posting a query and get assistance breaking down your most difficult brickwalls? Yes, show me how
  • Would you like to go shopping in a marketplace of over 700 items, including charts, scrapbooking materials, books and a variety of unique gifts and supplies? Yes, take me there
  • Would you like to search for your ancestors in a collection of over 6,000 transcribed documents that includes Masonic lodge rosters, funeral notices, school catalogues, telephone directories, insurance claims, directories, church member lists, prison records, etc.? Yes, take me there