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Lights, Camera, Action and Genealogy

If you haven't explored genealogy videos on Internet, now is the time to do it.

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Type: Article
Resource: Tracing Lines
Prepared by: Ruby Coleman
Word Count: 692 (approx.)
Labels: DNA Study 
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Pop the popcorn, grab a soda and pull your chair up to the computer. The show is about to begin. That's right folks, come right over to the showing of genealogy on your computer. If you haven't explored genealogy videos on Internet, now is the time to do it. The greatest benefit is they are FREE.

Most computers already have software installed for watching videos online. However, if you do not, for Windows and Mac there is RealOne Player, Windows Media Player and Apple Quick Time. They can be downloaded free off Internet. Just Google for the one that you might need.

First explore Roots Television. There you will find a selection of channels for watching free videos in categories such as How-to, DNA, Conferences, Photo Restoration, Libraries, Archives, Ethnic Roots and more. Be sure to mark your calendar to check their web site every Tuesday for new videos. By clicking on "Program Guide" you will see a listing of what is new, along with a description. You can also search the program guide. It is helpful to subscribe to the Roots Television newsletter and also follow Og's Blog, which can be done by linking to it from their main web page. One of their new videos is "A Better Way to Cite Online Sources." It is slightly over 7 minutes in link and worth watching. This particular video is presented by Mark Tucker of ThinkGenealogy. It is full of helpful information that you'll want to read.

YouTube.com currently has over 2,500 hits when you search or browse by entering "genealogy." Of course, you can add to that search term to narrow the search. Each video will indicate the time length, anywhere from a few minutes to an hour, along with when placed on YouTube and presenter. Some are not as professionally done as others, but some you may wish to watch more than once.

An easy way to locate genealogy videos is at the Genealogy Video Collection web page, http://gentube.ancestry-world.com/. Some of these also pop up on a YouTube search, but they are easier to locate on this web page. Along with the usual information, the videos are rated and a number of views is shown. A short video of slightly over one minute that is funny and entertaining is Genealogy or Looking for One's Own Peeps presented by the Birmingham Public Library.

If you are interested in DNA, watch the videos at Family Tree DNA, http://www.familytreedna.com/audio-video.aspx. Genealogy: Tracing Your DNA videos can be found at videojug, http://www.videojug.com/tag/genealogy-tracing-your-dna. On the right hand side of that page is a listing of Most Viewed in Genealogy. Be sure to check it out.

There is also an offering of genealogy videos on Google Video, http://video.google.com. Enter "genealogy" as a search term and see what turns up. It is a growing section of Google and don't be surprised if you'll be browsing through genealogy video listings for some time.

You can learn more about the Library of Congress and history by watching YouTube videos that they present at http://youtube.com/user/LibraryofCongress. Browse through their videos, playlists and groups to determine what might interest you.

Many genealogists subscribe to Family Tree Magazine, read their blog, listen to their podcast and subscribe to their newsletter. Did you know that you can also watch their videos online? They have their own YouTube channel at http://www.youtube.com/familytreemagazine.

Do you aspire to become a professional genealogist, but are not sure what it entails or where to begin? The Board for Certification of Genealogists (BCG) offers videos that will help you make the decision. They are in segments for easier viewing at http://bcgcertification.org/seminar/index.html.

The National Genealogical Society (NGS) will be holding their 2009 Family History Conference in Raleigh, North Carolina 13-16 May of this year. Nationally renowned filmmaker Allen Moore is producing a video for the National Genealogical Society. Moore was a cinematographer for several of Ken Burns' films including The Civil War. Watch for more information on this video at the NGS web page, National Genealogical Society.

Regardless of your research expertise, there is a video somewhere on Internet that you will enjoy. All you need is the popcorn, soda, computer and a comfy chair. Enjoy!

Source Information: Tracing Lines, New Providence, NJ, USA: Genealogy Today LLC, 2009.

The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of Genealogy Today LLC.

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